Tips guys!

Discuss specific martial art systems and other styles that you enjoy to see or practice yourself.
Aka Tek
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Re:

Postby Aka Tek » Thu Dec 11, 2008 6:46 pm

[Quote=Kwai Chang]I think you would really like this style. It's called the strongest Karate and you will definitely learn to fight! [/Quote]

What better place to start then lollollollol

Kwai Chang
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Postby Kwai Chang » Thu Dec 11, 2008 6:58 pm

I'm glad I could help Aka Tek. Keep me updated and enjoy your training!

Kwai Chang
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Postby Kwai Chang » Mon Dec 15, 2008 7:38 pm

Taekwondo has an extremely high percentage of McDojo operators. Therefore, one would definitely have to be selective. Personally I'm not a fan of sparring which requires 'Michelin Man' padding. Just my view. The real Hwang Jang Lee studied a 'rogue' Taekwondo style which wasn't in line with the federation.

Kwai Chang
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Postby Kwai Chang » Tue Dec 16, 2008 9:06 am

Hwang Jang Lee's Taekwondo is different from other styles. For example, he told Roy Horan than one would lose power by stretching. The thinking being that greater elasticity doesn't equal greater power.

I'm against padding and it's not because of any 'hardcore'/'macho' ideology. I just think it's totally unrealistic in terms of combat. If one doesn't experience contact (to a safe degree) then sparring is futile. This also opens up the old issue of whether modern competition sparring is even valid. The majority of famous point fighters became disgusted with the 'tag your opponent' scenario and moved on to the full contact circuit.

Kwai Chang
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Postby Kwai Chang » Tue Dec 16, 2008 3:14 pm

There is an important distinction between sport, art and real fighting. The type of padding used in Taekwondo is indicitive of a sport based combat system. I must stress that I'm [B]not[/B] being disparaging or questioning the individual's right to enjoy such a pursuit. I'll make that patently clear.

I disagree that only experts have effective control. Beginners are taught how to spar (without gloves/padding) in order to learn controlled delivery of strikes. Afterwhich, an intermediate student will be able to deliver a safe level of contact when sparring. By Shodan the student should be able to adequately judge what level of power is safe. In my opinion, real contact is a must. If one doesn't experience being hit then how can one cope in a life threatening confrontation? The shock would be overwhelming.

Aka Tek
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Joined: Fri Feb 17, 2006 5:00 pm

Re:

Postby Aka Tek » Tue Dec 16, 2008 5:53 pm

[Quote=Hwang Jang Lee] Hey Aka Tek, sorry to be late on the discussion.

I am sure Kyokushinkai is good as Kwai Chang suggests. The best thing to do is try a few classes to get a feel for things as every group/teacher is different. My personal recommendation would be to try Taekwondo; it incorporates alot of the explosive moves found in kick boxing. The advantages are that classes seem to have a better attitude from my experience, with kick boxers typically believing themselves 'hardcore', often to insensible standards and lacking respect for training partners and others. It also seems to be a little less dangerous in training and sparring. Plus Hwang Jang Lee is a practitioner, so that's a pretty good role model to have![/Quote]

Thanks for the tip Hwang. Ive been thinking about Taekwando before also. I spoke to a friend the other day and asked if he would like to maby start practising karate with me if I decide to do it. He then asked me what style and I told him what you guys have told me. He then explained that he had been practising that very style a while ago and had gotten a yellow belt before he had moved on. He also said that it was a good style though.

Kwai Chang
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Joined: Wed Mar 01, 2006 10:05 pm

Postby Kwai Chang » Thu Dec 18, 2008 4:41 pm

[Quote=Hwang Jang Lee] Yeah, well I guess I am not as hardcore as you guys in that I am not as willing to risk serious injury or worse when practising martial arts. It's all a personal choice and depends where your priorities/tastes lie. I think thats a choice all beginners must make too, so Aka Tek take heed![/Quote]

It's not an issue of being 'hardcore' or macho posturing. If control is taught then injury is vastly reduced. However, there is risk in any physical pursuit. It's to be expected in real martial arts.

Kwai Chang
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Joined: Wed Mar 01, 2006 10:05 pm

Postby Kwai Chang » Thu Dec 18, 2008 5:56 pm

[Quote=Hwang Jang Lee] Yeah, I'll have to try a real martial art one time! ;)[/Quote]

I haven't attempted to belittle you. What you try is nothing to do with me.

Fabhui
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Joined: Fri Jul 14, 2006 8:37 am

Postby Fabhui » Thu Dec 18, 2008 6:10 pm

I'm not exactly sure how you fellas train in your respective arts but I am under Tommy Carruthers who is a Jeet Kune Do instructor and it is absolutely necessary for us to wear some form of protective equipment for what we do.

If you are going all out and I mean all out in your training against mulitiple opponents in real life street fighting secnarios then without protective equipment you will find yourself in hospital quick sharp!!

I must stress though that how we train is not to spar with control but to fight and stop and take out an attacker as soon as an altercation becomes physical.

Kwai Chang
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Joined: Wed Mar 01, 2006 10:05 pm

Postby Kwai Chang » Fri Dec 19, 2008 6:34 pm

I have studied various systems but my core style is traditional Karate. My training is divided into actual self defense applications, competition and Kata. The self defense drills involve multiple attackers and could be called 'applied Karate'. I've advised my brother who has worked in the security field for a number of years.

Carruthers doesn't appeal to me but his place isn't that far from where I went to college. Do you travel up to Glasgow a lot?

[Quote=Hwang Jang Lee]Cheers for that Kwai Chang, always a pleasure to discuss MA with you.[/Quote]

Thanks.


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