Tips guys!

Discuss specific martial art systems and other styles that you enjoy to see or practice yourself.
Aka Tek
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Joined: Fri Feb 17, 2006 5:00 pm

Tips guys!

Postby Aka Tek » Tue Dec 09, 2008 6:13 pm

Ive been thinking about maby joining a martial arts club if everything goes as planned but I dont know what style that suits me best. It would be good if the style can be used as self defence and maby even in combat (as another hobby of mine is to beat up people, just kidding). It would be good if the style isnt to complicated as I dont know how much time I hopefully can spend practising the style at the moment. I was thinking maby Thai-boxing at first, as it uses a lot of knees and frontal kicks (dont know if thats the technical term but still) along with the element of boxing (as far as Im aware atleast.....) But after checking what the different pads and protection would cost to buy Ive decided that maby I have to check for options.

Will appreciate any tips from you guys.

Kwai Chang
Posts: 1505
Joined: Wed Mar 01, 2006 10:05 pm

Postby Kwai Chang » Tue Dec 09, 2008 6:37 pm

A good decision Aka Tek. Everyone (especially in this day and age) should be able to defend themselves. In terms of styles, it really depends what is available in your area. Each system has something to offer and some may suit your needs more than others. My own background is in traditional Karate. However, I have trained in other systems. If you have any questions then feel free to ask.

I'm going to the Philippines to see my cousins in April and will be visiting Hong Kong for five days beforehand. While there I'll train at a Hung Kuen school which is highly recommended.

Aka Tek
Posts: 1490
Joined: Fri Feb 17, 2006 5:00 pm

Postby Aka Tek » Tue Dec 09, 2008 7:03 pm

Thanks Kwai Chang. Im not aware of all the different styles that are available but the following list contains some that I know are availble to practise:
Brazilian Jiujitsu,
Jujutsu,
Kickboxing,
Thaiboxing,
Budo Taijutsu,
Taekwondo,
Karate,
Aikido,
Tsu Shin Gen,
Shaolin ("different styles" ?),
Choy Lee Fut,
Krav Maga/Defendo,
Bagua,
Taiji,
Xing Yi,
MMA/Shooto/Vale Tudo,
Wing Chun

Some of those I dont even know what they mean...... So any tips will be appreciated.

How is karate then Kwai? Do you need to be very flexible to practise it and does it take a long time to get "good" at it?

Have a nice trip by the way.

Kwai Chang
Posts: 1505
Joined: Wed Mar 01, 2006 10:05 pm

Postby Kwai Chang » Tue Dec 09, 2008 8:12 pm

No problem Aka Tek. The arts are usually divided into striking and grappling disciplines. For example, Jujitsu, Judo and Aikido are grappling arts. Alternatively, Karate, Taekwondo, Kung Fu and Muay Thai are striking arts. It depends which you prefer. In addition, some styles such as Shorinji Kempo and Hapkido involve striking and grappling.

Budo Taijutsu is actually the unarmed aspect of Ninjutsu as taught by the Bujinkan school and Dr. Hatsumi. Tsu Shin Gen is Karate mixed with some MMA techniques. Choy Lee Fut is a traditional Kung Fu style which utilises northern footwork and southern hand techniques. The Shaolin styles are divided into southern and northern styles i.e Hung Kuen and Tai Mantis. The southern styles have low stances/kicks and the northern systems feature high kicks. Wing Chun is an economical southern style with rapid, straight punches and kicks which don't go higher than the waist. It's less flowery than the animal styles. Bagua, Taiji and Xing Yi are internal Kung Fu styles.

Shooto/Vale Tudo are mixed martial arts and Defendo is a Jujitsu derivation. Krav Maga is discussed in the forum thread. Karate is a good solid style and one can become proficient quite quickly if the basics are mastered. I started training when I was six years old as my father was an instructor. I attained Shodan and it gave me a base from which to expand. Beginners don't have to be extremely flexible and training will increase this.

Karate has a multitude of styles. I'd recommend visiting a Kyokushinkai dojo if you happen to live near one. There is a great deal of emphasis on Kumite and it doesn't involve any gloves or padding.

Good luck in your search and don't hesitate to ask any further questions.

Aka Tek
Posts: 1490
Joined: Fri Feb 17, 2006 5:00 pm

Postby Aka Tek » Tue Dec 09, 2008 8:32 pm

Thanks for that informative answer mate.

Ive watched some Jujitsu and it looks like its a pretty nice style but have some doubts how good it suits for combat streetfighter style.

Like I said, I was thinking more along the lines of Thai Boxing so maby "the striking arts" are worth ckecking for.

There is a karate club that have an instructor that is 9 Dan. Thats pretty good isnt it? The site doesnt say what (sub)style they train though.

Also, have you got any experience of the following styles: Chang Quan (Long fist , from Taiwan) or Ashihara Karate?

Kwai Chang
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Joined: Wed Mar 01, 2006 10:05 pm

Postby Kwai Chang » Tue Dec 09, 2008 9:06 pm

Hideyuki Ashihara was a Kyokushinkai practitioner who was expelled from the organisation and created his own style. Chang Quan is a northern Wushu style but also includes some Chin Na (locking techniques).

Personally, I'd be wary of a westerner claiming to be a 9th dan. The instructor should be able to give details of their lineage etc. Unfortunately there are many 'McDojos' which hand out black belts like candy. Jujitsu includes chokes and the traditional Japanese system includes Atemi Waza (pressure points). It's efficiency on the street rests with the individual. The same is true of all arts.

Aka Tek
Posts: 1490
Joined: Fri Feb 17, 2006 5:00 pm

Re:

Postby Aka Tek » Thu Dec 11, 2008 5:49 pm

Thanks again. The master didnt have an western name though, but I think there might have been an missunderstanding about the instruction part. I dont think he was working at that dojo. Anyway, I might have located another place that are practising Kyokushin karate. Anything you can tell about that style?

[Quote=Kwai Chang]
Personally, I'd be wary of a westerner claiming to be a 9th dan. The instructor should be able to give details of their lineage etc. Unfortunately there are many 'McDojos' which hand out black belts like candy. Jujitsu includes chokes and the traditional Japanese system includes Atemi Waza (pressure points). It's efficiency on the street rests with the individual. The same is true of all arts.[/Quote]

Kwai Chang
Posts: 1505
Joined: Wed Mar 01, 2006 10:05 pm

Postby Kwai Chang » Thu Dec 11, 2008 6:14 pm

Kyokushinkai was founded by the legendary Mas Oyama. Oyama's style of Karate is tough and places great emphasis on actual fighting (without gloves, pads etc). I'd recommend that you take up this style. It's traditional and has a substantial history. Mas Oyama is still a folk hero in Japan and is famous for fighting a bull. There are a number of movies about his life including Fighter In The Wind and a trilogy starring Sonny Chiba.

You are very fortunate to have a Kyokushinkai dojo in your area.

Aka Tek
Posts: 1490
Joined: Fri Feb 17, 2006 5:00 pm

Postby Aka Tek » Thu Dec 11, 2008 6:28 pm

Maby thats the style then! Ive watched Sonny Chiba kick that bull but didnt know that much about the actuall style appart from that I know that movie is part of a trilogy (Mas Oyama) like you say. The movie is pretty wicked by the way.
Ive been trying to figure out what the Gi (is that the name for the cloathes by the way) are costing but dont know if you should buy through the club? They use their own signum on the clothes, that much I know though.

Kwai Chang
Posts: 1505
Joined: Wed Mar 01, 2006 10:05 pm

Postby Kwai Chang » Thu Dec 11, 2008 6:44 pm

The Gi (Dogi) will be reasonably priced and you could purchase it via the club (possibly with a member discount). The Kanji (Japanese characters) say Kyokushinkai.

I think you would really like this style. It's called the strongest Karate and you will definitely learn to fight!


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