T'ai Chi

Share your opinions on Martial Arts in General. Whether nameless or not.
Fabhui
Posts: 446
Joined: Fri Jul 14, 2006 8:37 am

Postby Fabhui » Sat Jul 14, 2007 9:27 pm

Hi Jade,

I really meant what kind of drills and training methods you do to make what you do reality based as opposed to just sparring.

If you prefer not to say then that is fine, I don't mind sharing how we train if anyone is interested.

Fabhui
Posts: 446
Joined: Fri Jul 14, 2006 8:37 am

Postby Fabhui » Sun Jul 15, 2007 1:19 pm

Hi Jade,

It sounds as though you enjoy your training and get a lot out of it which at then end of the day is what is important.

The kind of training I do is quite a fair bit different than the kind of training you are doing. I was involved in what is and can be an extremely violent industry for a number of years and as such my training refelcts this.

Different people have different needs and this will be evident in how they train their particular arts.


Kwai Chang
Posts: 1505
Joined: Wed Mar 01, 2006 10:05 pm

Postby Kwai Chang » Sun Jul 15, 2007 2:18 pm

[Quote=Jade Phoenix]a style should be real and not based on theory or too much philosophy.[/Quote]

Philosophy shouldn't be disregarded. That is what seperates the 'art' from mere brawling. It stands to reason that there is theory behind every action. The key is to assimilate and act efficiently in a 'real' scenario. To this end, the most effective means of 'practice' is having other students attempt to overwhelm one at the same time. Such training is at the core of Aikido. Personally, I find this much more beneficial than Kata/maintaining stances. I base this on having studied Shotokan Karate from the age of six years old and knowing people in the security field.

I've also studied Northern Shaolin with Chinese friends. What's your instructor's name? I may have heard of him.


Kwai Chang
Posts: 1505
Joined: Wed Mar 01, 2006 10:05 pm

Postby Kwai Chang » Sun Jul 15, 2007 3:32 pm

Philosophy is at the core of everything (pun intended). Whether one embraces it or not is another matter. Incidentally, Bruce Lee also stated that biting is a good way to lose your teeth. I wouldn't recommend it in real life...

I don't see the corelation between emphasis on stance work and vital points. Are you talking about traditional stance work? Also, I meant to ask what the system you train in is called?

Fabhui
Posts: 446
Joined: Fri Jul 14, 2006 8:37 am

Re:Re:

Postby Fabhui » Sun Jul 15, 2007 3:54 pm

[Quote=Jade Phoenix]
What kind of violent industry are involved in?
(No need to answer if you don't want to...):)

I would like to know what kind of training you do if you don't mind...[/Quote]

I worked as a Bouncer for several years and unfortuantely violence was a pretty regular occurrence as some people won't listen to reason and just want to make a hole in the ground with your head! So over the course of that time I was involved in a lot of altercations, saw first hand the seriousness of what happens when it kicks off for real, had weapons pulled out on me including guns. This happens to most doormen at some time or other.

As for my training, we like to keep things as close to reality as possible which means we don't spar, we fight! The difference being we generally start about 3 feet away from each other, in a neutral natural stance. One will attack without warning and the other person has to try their upmost to stop the attack. When in range we don't fire a few shots move out of range, then move back in to fire a few more. Our goal is once you are in range everything you throw must be a finishing move and you stay in range until the job is done which is what happens in reality.

We train in different environments, in different temperatures, in regualr street clothing, in different levels of light including close to pitch black where you are attacked and have to defend yourself.
We train 1 on 1, 2 on 1, 3 on one and 4 on 1. Fighting from vulnerable posistions such as sitting down, backed up against a wall, backed into a corner, from behind without any kind of warning.
We do drills where you lay on the ground, with someone on top of you and another guy 5 feet away. You have 10 secs to fight the guy off you but after the 10 secs if you are not successful and back on your feet then the other guy can join in and start to stick the boot in.
We do gang fight training where it is one group against another group.
Training where one person stands in the middle of the room and everyone else just mills about the person, sometimes bumping into them, jostling them and then without any warning anyone or any number of people can attack the person who then has to defend themself.

We try and get things as close to reality as possible because when the brown stuff hits the fan how you train is how you will react. If you train to spar then that's what you will do, if you train semi-contact then that's what you'll end up doing in a real situation.


The drills I've mentioned barely scratch the surface of what we do along with all the other supplemental and conditioning training we also do. Also what we do isn't brawling, you need propper techniques and the training that goes with them to pull them off effectively, otherwise you will end up getting battered!

Fabhui
Posts: 446
Joined: Fri Jul 14, 2006 8:37 am

Re:

Postby Fabhui » Sun Jul 15, 2007 4:04 pm

[Quote=Kwai Chang] Incidentally, Bruce Lee also stated that biting is a good way to lose your teeth. I wouldn't recommend it in real life...[/Quote]

He was referring to going into a fight with the mindset purely on biting the person instead of applying it in close range when the situation arises.

I'm a Jeet Kune Do practitioner and biting is in there when it comes to close quarters, although ideally you would have finished them off before they even got that close. It's not a good idea to let anyone get that close to you in a real situation. It's at that range where knives are pulled and people get stabbed!!!

Kwai Chang
Posts: 1505
Joined: Wed Mar 01, 2006 10:05 pm

Postby Kwai Chang » Sun Jul 15, 2007 5:48 pm

[Quote=Fabhui]He was referring to going into a fight with the mindset purely on biting the person instead of applying it in close range when the situation arises.[/Quote]

I know. He talked about the biting scenario in 'Longstreet'. Personally, I wouldn't consider it in this day and age. As you said, it's better to take an attacker out before that line of action is even a consideration. I'm not deriding JKD, it's just my view.

Fabhui
Posts: 446
Joined: Fri Jul 14, 2006 8:37 am

Postby Fabhui » Sun Jul 15, 2007 6:26 pm

It's great to see all of you are very open minded and also keeping your training REAL. Hopefully you will never have to use it!
I've always said I don't care what style you train in it might be JKD, Hung Gar, Judo, Muay Thai, Tai Chi, Shotokan or whatever but it is the PERSON and their training that makes the art work in a situation, not the other way around!!
Unfortunately it seems most these days think that forms / katas, sparring and going to the ground (due to the popularity of BJJ) is what is going to save their necks, unfortuantely this isn't the case, I wish it was as it would make things a lot easier!! I have to also say that I do think forms at a certain time in your training have their place!

Your Dad would have seen a lot of scary stuff Pete! Those areas you mentioned are renowned for their violence!!

Being invloved in that kind of industry isn't the nicest job in the world. The threat of violence is extremely high and most of the time you get no thanks for what you do.

I'm with you on the whole biting issue Kwai !! If you end up that close then something has gone seriously wrong. If I had to I would prefer to bite a person through their clothing for obvious reasons but most times the areas that are most exposed and vulnerable are the nose, ear and cheeks. [B]HOWEVER[/B], if biting someone's nose off meant I got to see tomorrow then I'll be taking that option.
Not very nice but true.


Kwai Chang
Posts: 1505
Joined: Wed Mar 01, 2006 10:05 pm

Postby Kwai Chang » Mon Jul 16, 2007 10:41 pm

I'm from Glasgow and my younger brother is a bouncer at one of the city's nightclubs. Like a lot of areas of the UK, Glasgow has a long standing reputation as a tough place and he's dealt with some dangerous situations. For example, a few months ago he had to intervene after a female police officer was attacked outside the club.

More or less each night he has to physically remove abusive and violent clubbers. Such situations are potentially life threatening and one must be prepared to act quickly. To this end, I advised my brother to study Aikido at the Dojo I train at. The joint locks and throws we study are perfectly suited to the demands of his job.

El_Matador
Posts: 138
Joined: Sat Feb 26, 2011 4:48 pm

Postby El_Matador » Mon Mar 21, 2011 9:31 pm

Since we have people who are skilled with it, I have a question about the chi blast. I was watching some videos with taichi practicioners who been pushing people over from 10ft away. Is this possible? How does the energy blast work?


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